LEADERSHIP ~ Officers


President
Clifton Pike
President Elect

TBD
Secretary

Debbie Iannitto
Treasurer

Randy Gray
Sargent at Arms

Bruce Birnbaum
Past President/Membership

Deedra Durocher


LEADERSHIP ~ Directors


New Generations
Deirdre Kiernan
Club Service

TBD
Vocational Service

Cecilia Chittick
International Service

Dwight Carlblom
Community Service/Newsletter

Dale Elks


LEADERSHIP ~ Assistant Directors & Committee Chairs


Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms
Bill Cheesman
Public Relations

Richard Goldstein
Foundation

Gene Foster
Program Chair

Linda MacDonald
Assistant Program Chair

Lori Ann Prill
RYLA

Cinda Hill
Health & Happiness

TBD
CARTS

John Griffin
OktoberFest Co-Chair

Nancy Fisher
OktoberFest Co-Chair

Joni Bass
Kicks-for-Kids

Tom Gingrich


Rotary Basics

Objects of Rotary

As the basis of worthy enterprise, the Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service:

  • FIRST – the development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
  • SECOND – high ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
  • THIRD – the application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life;
  • FOURTH: – the advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.

The Four Way Test

Rotary was founded on the basis of promoting high ethical standards in the professional lives of all members. One of the world’s most widely printed and quoted statements of business ethics is The Four-Way Test, which was created by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor when he took charge of a company that was facing bankruptcy. The survival of the company is credited to this simple 24-word test for employees to follow as a guide to all their business dealings from production to all relations with both dealers and customers.

Rotary adopted The Four-Way Test in 1943 as a nonpartisan and nonsectarian ethical guide for Rotarians to use for their personal and professional relationships. Since that time it has been translated into more than a hundred languages. The test is stated as follows:

Of the things we think, say or do:

  • First: Is it the TRUTH?
  • Second: Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  • Third: Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  • Fourth: Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

Avenues of Service

Rotarians channel their commitment to service at home and abroad through five Avenues of Service, which are the foundation of club activity.

  • Club Service focuses on making our club strong. A thriving club is anchored by strong relationships and an active membership development plan.
  • Vocational Service calls on every Rotarian to work with integrity and contribute their expertise to the problems and needs of society.
  • Community Service encourages every Rotarian to find ways to improve the quality of life for people in their communities and to serve the public interest.
  • International Service exemplifies our global reach in promoting peace and understanding. We support this service avenue by sponsoring or volunteering on international projects, seeking partners abroad, and more.
  • Youth Service recognizes the importance of empowering youth and young professionals through leadership development programs such as Interact, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA), Rotary Youth Exchange and Rotaract,

Rotary Code of Conduct

  1. Act with integrity and high ethical standards in both personal and professional life
  2. Deal fairly with others and treat them and their occupations with respect
  3. Use professional skills through Rotary to mentor young people, help those with special needs, and improve people’s quality of life in the local community and in the world
  4. Avoid behavior that reflects adversely on Rotary or other Rotarians